Pictures Came and Broke Your Heart

Dr. Who, BBC Sherlock.
"A straight line may be the shortest distance between two points, but it is by no means the most interesting."

thestraggletag:

alonesomes:

my sexuality is Mr. Darcy helping Elizabeth into the carriage and then flexing his fingers as he walks away like he can feel her seeping into his skin

My sexuality is that and also Mr Thornton looking longingly at Margaret Hale’s carriage driving away, whispering: “Look back. Look back at me.”

(via starlesswaters)

mare-moment:

mare-moment:

My snapchat story y’all

WHY DOES THIS HAVE SO MANY NOTES HAHAHAH

(via callmemoprah)

darling-xoxo:

Source: http://www.quinncooperstyle.com/2013/05/boho-spaces/

“When you’re young, thunderstorms seem scary. Like the sky is angry at you. But now that I’m older, something about its roar soothes me; it’s comforting to know that even nature needs to scream sometimes.”

—   Unknown (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

(Source: c0ntemplations, via thrillbandit)

charmedsevenfold:

snoozlebee:

lepetitdragon:

tenaciousbee:

destroyer:





WHAT’S GOIN’ ON!



Everyone else can go home

OMFG

omg lol

best cosplay of all time

I love that the cheekbones are drawn on her face.

warning: my policy for this blog is to repost this every time it pops up on my dash

can we take a moment to appreciate the fact that every troll cosplayer in this picture is a terezi

charmedsevenfold:

snoozlebee:

lepetitdragon:

tenaciousbee:

destroyer:

WHAT’S GOIN’ ON!

image

Everyone else can go home

OMFG

omg lol

best cosplay of all time

I love that the cheekbones are drawn on her face.

warning: my policy for this blog is to repost this every time it pops up on my dash

can we take a moment to appreciate the fact that every troll cosplayer in this picture is a terezi

(Source: geekingabout, via pizza)

striderbeegood:

tingletits:

notspying:

Summoning the ogrelord

he went to gods thumb and came back

Wow holes fandom way to climb out of your hole

striderbeegood:

tingletits:

notspying:

Summoning the ogrelord

he went to gods thumb and came back

Wow holes fandom way to climb out of your hole

(Source: amart, via tegansenpai)


°

enigmaticrose:

We’re funny, okay?

(via fuckitfireeverything)

astoriaphilo:

Dead Kennedys

astoriaphilo:

Dead Kennedys

(via shakespeareandpunk)

“No single Greek god even approaches Dionysus in the horror of his epithets, which near witness to a savagery that is absolutely without mercy… He is called the “render of men”, “the eater of raw flesh”, “who delights in the sword and bloodshed”. We hear not only of human sacrifice in his cult, but also of the ghastly ritual in which a man is torn to pieces. Where does this put us? Surely there can be no further doubt that this puts us into death’s sphere. The terrors of destruction, which make all if life tremble, belong also, as horrible desire, to the kingdom of Dionysus. The monster whose supernatural duality speaks to us from the mask has one side of his nature turned toward eternal night.”

—   Walter F. Otto, Dionysus: Myth and Cult (via argonauticae)

(via sarahtaylorgibson)

schizoauthoress:

Persephone as a dark and off-putting goddess who worries her mother by hanging out with satyrs and making weird stuff like pitcher plants and Venus flytraps. Hades being charmed and intimidated all at once.

(Source: harshcutieszoos, via sarahtaylorgibson)

foxheartx:

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOH.

foxheartx:

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOH.

(Source: c0cainkeys, via tricky-stump)

let-us-get-down-my-dear-watson:

LISTEN UP
THIS IS IMPORTANT. Take a dollar and get a freaking card and send it to this kid. Heck MAKE ONE. Take 2 minutes to do something good and humanish today people. PLEASE I AM ASKING YOU TO DO THIS.

let-us-get-down-my-dear-watson:

LISTEN UP

THIS IS IMPORTANT. Take a dollar and get a freaking card and send it to this kid. Heck MAKE ONE. Take 2 minutes to do something good and humanish today people. PLEASE I AM ASKING YOU TO DO THIS.

(via athenadark)

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

(via slothcifer)